Jessie J calls on people in Scotland to add their voice to Stroke Association campaign.

Around one in three people in Scotland have aphasia, a communication disability which can be caused by stroke.

The charity’s Lost for Words campaign aims to raise awareness of the challenges this can cause for people who have had a stroke and their families.

Jessie J said: “Having a stroke turns your life upside down in an instant and it was the scariest experience of my life. I’m one of the lucky ones who’s recovered well, but many other stroke survivors aren’t so lucky, and have lost their speech or can’t read or write. I can’t imagine what that must be like, which is why I’ve got so much respect and admiration for the survivors who every day are finding different ways to express themselves again. The Stroke Association’s Lost for Words campaign is brilliant because it’s highlighting this problem and raising funds for its work supporting the people who need it. That’s why I’m backing Lost for Words, and I hope you will too.”

Andrea Cail, Director Scotland at the Stroke Association, said: “Many stroke survivors tell us just how terrifying and isolating it can be to have aphasia. But with the right help and support, many people are able to find new ways to communicate, and can rebuild their lives.”

The charity is urging people to show their support for stroke survivors who are lost for words and make a donation. For more information, visit www.stroke.org.uk/lostforwords

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