• Author: Walk Fife
  • Created: June 9, 2017
  • Updated: June 20, 2018
Tags:
Route type: Short Strolls
Difficulty grade: Grade 3

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  • Distance Instructions
Label
  • Distance 2 km
  • Duration 37 min
  • AVG speed 4 km/h
  • Min altitude 0 m
  • Peak 0 m
  • Climb 0 m
  • Descent 0 m

The ruins of Waterloo Tower are part of Fife’s hidden history.

The remains tower can be found on a hill top surrounded by woodland to the West of the coastal town of Tayport.

The tower, as it is seen now was constructed in 1800’s on the ruins of a much older building to commemorate the victory of Waterloo  and served watch tower and navigation beacon for ships sailing along the River Tay. I discovered the tower after driving the road nearby on a sunny winter day and I spotted the tower poking out from the woods and had to investigate.

This route involves some scrabbling around  (wall, rubble, scrub etc) so may not be suitable for all. There are alternate routes to the tower but I have found this to be the one which offers the best views.

This route begins in a coastal car park NO 4355 2902 where there enough spaces for a small number of cars. The route cross over the road on to a established pathway. Follow the path as it zig zags through a small woodland until you reach a fork in the path where you need to hop over to the fence on the left and over the wall into the wood (not the field). Follow the wall for a short distance and then cut through the wood up the hill and out on to the field. This field was home to cows when I visited last so take care when crossing the field.

If you enter the field and are unsure of the cows then move away calmly, do not panic and make no sudden noises. Chances are the cows will leave you alone once they establish that you pose no threat. If you walk through a field of cows and there happen to be calves, think twice; if you can, go another way and avoid crossing fields. The tower can be reached by alternate routes - consult your map for reference. More information on farm animals is available here http://www.outdooraccess-scotland.com/Practical-guide/public/Fields-with-farm-animals

After crossing the field enter the wood where you will see the ruins of the tower. This part of the wood is covered with scrub land and can be challenging to get through but it is only for  short distance. Upon reaching the tower you will be able to get an impression on how large it actually was and why when it was built it could easily be seen from the river (there was no woodland surrounding it back then). Avoid climbing on the ruin as it is not maintained in any way and looks to be structurally unstable in some areas.

Leaving the tower the route takes you downwards through the wood and meets up with a main track which when you turn right leads you back to your staring point.

The walk while short does allow you get a little insight to the areas seafaring past and is one I am glad I discovered.

Route shared with Walk Fife by Tim Evans.

View route on OS Maps -
https://osmaps.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/route/1309706/Waterloo-Tower-Explore-Walk-Fife

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